Monday, April 14, 2014

Predicting Kidding or Why My Goats Think I'm Nuts

4/14/2014 8:59:00 AM
Belle and HeidiI think trying to predict when kids are going to be born is part guesswork, part science, and part voodoo. I’ve been checking the prospective mothers to be and have been stymied. I generally know when they will give birth (I keep my does in with the buck several days to ensure that it took), but honestly,

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/predicting-kidding-zbcz1404.aspx#ixzz2ytZpEfPN

Thursday, April 3, 2014

Raining (Goat) Kids

4/2/2014 4:32:00 PM
“Goat Baby Alert! Goat Baby Alert!” I woke up to my husband’s shouts.
Lulu's Kids
“Which one?” I asked, but he disappeared and hurried back down to the barn. Just as I barely finished dressing, he had brought two very wet, shivering kids with their umbilical cords still dragging into the house.

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/raining-goat-kids-zbcz1404.aspx#ixzz2xtQmLA5L

Saturday, March 15, 2014

Kidding-Season Tragedy


As usual, everything is last minute when it comes to preparing. That’s usually because I’m so darn busy doing everything else that by the time I’m thinking about the kids, I’ve realize that the pen I had the does kid in last season is housing waterfowl because a skunk killed three ducks and my best goose. My husband moved the waterfowl in that pen while we planned to live-trap the skunk. Read more: At Mother Earth News

Monday, January 27, 2014

Secret Gardens (via www.goodlifereport.com)
  The slow food revolution has swept across the country. While restaurants in Europe and elsewhere have been utilizing locally sourced produce, meat and dairy for some time, Americans were slow to catch on. Thanks to activist chef Alice Waters and…

Tuesday, January 21, 2014

Dealing With Goats in Cold Weather



Goats EatingAt the homestead in Montana this past November and December, we had brutal cold with temperatures dropping below zero for weeks. Naturally, I was fearful the goats would have problems with it.

Unlike other livestock, goats are particularly susceptible to bad weather such as wind and rain. They’re not like cattle and other livestock that can deal with bad weather easily. Goats need enough shelter to get out of the rain and the wind. Without it, you can have your flock succumb to hypothermia and frostbite.

READ MORE HERE

Wednesday, December 18, 2013

The Yule Goat

12/17/2013 10:19:00 AM
Mocha Playing the Part of the Yule GoatIt’s been about two years since I first got my goats, so when I learned about the Yule Goat (or buck), I was intrigued. It appears that goats have been a part of Scandinavian Yule tradition longer than Christianity and have been incorporated into Christmas celebrations. Yule was basically — and still is with neo-pagans — a celebration of the winter solstice.

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/homesteading-and-livestock/the-yule-goat-zbcz1312.aspx#ixzz2nr8daqKb

Thursday, December 12, 2013

Pest Control Delivered by Bees (via http://eatdrinkbetter.com)
Pest control delivered by bees may seem like a strange idea, but test studies have shown remarkable promise. The technique, called bee vectoring technology, is simple. As bees leave their hive, they walk through a tray containing pest control agents…